The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for the Year ..., Volume 67

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Edmund Burke
J. Dodsley, 1826
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As well as being a record of events, The Annual Register was originally conceived as a miscellany, including a Chronology, which gave an account of noteworthy events in Britain over the previous year, and a collection of “State Papers”, a miscellany of primary source material which included official documents, speeches, letters and accounts as well as reviewing important books, and featuring historical sketches, poetry, observations on natural history, and other essays, reproduced from books and periodicals. The early volumes of The Annual Register continued to follow this format, with contributions articles on international organizations, economics, the environment, science, law, religion, the arts (art, drama, music) and sport, together with poetry, obituaries, patents, a chronicle of major events. Although Burke was elected to parliament in 1765 and was a committed and prominent Whig,The Annual Register strove to remain non-partisan in its political coverage. After the end of the war in 1763, the History section evolved to cover the past year’s developments more generally in Britain, its colonies, and mainland Europe. From 1775 its length was significantly increased, becoming the main focus of the publication. Burke apparently resigned the editorship in 1789; from that year until the final defeat of Napoleon in 1815 the History was primarily devoted to describing the French Revolution and the wars arising from it.
 

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Page 34 - An Act for the further limitation of the crown, and better securing the rights and liberties of the subject...
Page 50 - I do swear that I will bear faith and true allegiance to his Majesty King George and him will defend to the utmost of my power against all traitorous conspiracies and attempts whatsoever which shall be made against his person, crown or dignity; and I will do my utmost endeavour to disclose...
Page 34 - Attempts whatever, which shall be made against his Person, Crown, or Dignity ; and I will do my utmost Endeavour to disclose and make known to His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, all Treasons and traitorous Conspiracies which may be formed against...
Page 37 - Assembly; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, that it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty, his heirs and successors, by...
Page 33 - ... the Pope or any other authority or person whatsoever, or without any hope of any such dispensation from any person or authority whatsoever, or without thinking that I am or can be acquitted before God or man or absolved of this declaration or any part thereof, although the Pope or any other person or persons or power whatsoever should dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.
Page 107 - WE, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
Page 128 - While foreign nations less blessed with that freedom which is power than ourselves are advancing with gigantic strides in the career of public improvement, were we to slumber in indolence or fold up our arms and proclaim to the world that we are palsied by the will of our constituents, would it not be to cast away the bounties of Providence and doom ourselves to perpetual inferiority?
Page 53 - And I do declare that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state, or potentate hath, or ought to have, any jurisdiction, power, superiority, preeminence, or authority, ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this realm : So help me God.
Page 63 - That whenever the summit of the mountains which extend in a direction parallel to the coast from the 56th degree of north latitude to the point of intersection of the 141st degree of west longitude shall prove to be at the distance of more than ten marine leagues from the ocean, the limit between the British possessions and the line of coast which is to belong to Russia as above mentioned...
Page 49 - Christ, at or after the consecration thereof, by any person whatsoever ; and that the invocation or adoration of the Virgin Mary, or any other saint, and the sacrifice of the Mass, as they are now used in the Church of Rome, are superstitious and idolatrous.

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