The History of the Norman Conquest of England: The reign of William the Conqueror. 1876

Front Cover
Clarendon Press, 1876
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Contents

March 11 Revolt against Copsige he is killed by Oswulf
106
Unsuccessful attack on Dover escape of Eustace
117
119122
123
February William demands the submission of Exeter 1068
145
of the hostages
155
June 24
159
their lands history of Eadnoth and his
163
pressions of the Sheriff Urse he is rebuked
173
301
179
Eadwine and Morkere revolt rising in the North
181
The English army disperses but a party withdraw
193
The fleet enters the Humber it is joined by Eadgar
195
leges of the Earldom
205
Chester the last conquest former history of
211
PAGE
221
September? Birth of the Ætheling Henry his name education
227
420
228
William sends away his mercenaries
233
Siege of the castle William hastens to York
239
Swegen at last sends help description of his force
247
Stories of Archbishop Ealdred his death
265
Movements in the West sieges of Montacute
271
William conquers Staffordshire and marches
281
CHAPTER XIX
289
Dec 25 1069 He keeps Christmas at York settlement of York
295
No open revolt in the conquered shires but the West
303
Dec 1114 Flight of Æthelwine and his canons from Durham
317
THE ECCLESIASTICAL SETTLEMENT OF ENGLAND
320
land
323
The Councils of the Year 1070
327
Saint Augustines
336
General flight of the people
345
Trial and deprivation of Stigand stories of his last
351
Lanfranc and Thomas go to Rome for their pallia
353
Works of Thomas at York 369371
369
scheme for the substitution of canons for monks 371373
371
He rebuilds the church of Worcester 379380
379
1077
383
ecclesiastical and temporal assemblies 387389
387
Deposition of Æthelmær
389
with John of Fécamp 397398
397
Decree for the removal of Bishopricks comparison
413
1086
417
Remigius removes the see of Dorchester to Lincoln
419
December 25 William keeps Christmas at Westminster further
427
1078?
428
1068?
450
1070
453
November 27 Death of Brand of Peterborough he is succeeded
459
Position of Eadwine and Morkere
462
England not yet conquered
471
tenures
477
1082
481
482485
483
Council of Lillebonne reenactment of the Truce
485
1073
489
Roger of Montgomery Earl of Shrewsbury privi
491
Municipal traditions in Gaul the Commune of
555
Dealings of William with Waltheof
571
William sets forth to recover Maine his English
581
The Danish fleet in the Humber plunder of York
585
536
589
character
595
537538
601
Character of the resistance to William after his Coro
603
June 15 Waltheofs body translated to Crowland
605
1077
637
William reconciled to his son Gregorys letter
643
1082
647
November 3 Death of Queen Matilda her tomb and epitaph
651
Restoration of Whitby
662
Autumn Roberts expedition to Scotland foundation of New
672
Christmas
673
10831084
682
10851086
687
May 24
691
history
697
troops
699
Legal fictions of his reign
709
Whitsun Gemót at Westminster Henry dubbed
715
Fulk attacks La Flèche he is joined by Howel
719
1089
721
296
723
3942
729
Williams sickness at Rouen Philips jest
737
17
743
A D
753
19
755
January
773
March 1067
779
Deaths of his children in the New Forest a curse
799
April 6
803
May 15 1076 His final trial and condemnation to death injustice
813
KK Frithric Abbot of Saint Albans
822
658
830
NN The Succession of Abbots of Ely
833
State of the North no more Earls of Deira or Mercia
843
640641
845
Harrying of Maine sieges of Fresnay and Sillé sur
846
May 31
849
YY The Betrothal of Williams Daughter to Alfonso
852
Later bistory of Æthelsige his outlawry
853
659
855
647650
861
660661
862
Analogy between the position of William and Harold
865
451452
866
662663
868
665667
879
605606
881
683684
882
674675
885
THE LATER DAYS OF WILLIAM 10761087
891
691694
894

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 508 - Never indeed was any man more contented with doing his duty in that state of life to which it had pleased God to call him.
Page 312 - The alms of the settlement, in this dreadful exigency, were certainly .liberal ; and all was done by charity that private charity could do ; but it was a people in beggary ; it was a nation which stretched out its hands for food.
Page 688 - So very narrowly he caused it to be " traced out, that there was not a single hide, nor one virgate of land, nor even, " it is shame to tell. though it seemed to him no shame to do, an ox, nor a cow, " nor a swine was left, that was not set down.
Page 688 - He sent over all England into ilk shire his men, and let them find out how many hundred hides were in the shire, or what the king himself had of land or cattle in the land, or whilk rights he ought to have.
Page 795 - ... performances and his other actions. On the other hand, a transcriber meeting with any of the unintelligible forms which I have just quoted might think it a clever hit to substitute some familiar name, Henry or any other. As to the internal probability of the work being Alfred's, we know pretty well what his attainments were, what he wrote and what he translated. There is no evidence that he ever translated any fables, and there is nothing to show that he had any knowledge of Greek. In fact the...
Page 290 - Before the end of the year, Yorkshire was a wilderness. The bodies of its inhabitants were rotting in the streets, in the highways, or on their own hearthstones; and those who had escaped from sword, fire, and hunger, had fled out of the land.
Page 773 - ... thousands of people. Only, while in the later version they are Danes slain by William, in the earlier account they are people, of whatever nation, slain by Waltheof and his companions. Roger of Wendover tells us how Eadgar, Waltheof, and the rest, " Junctis viribus ad Eboracum venientes, urbem cum castello quantocius occuparunt, et multa ibidem hominum millia peremerunt.
Page 827 - Comitis," who, to say nothing of his remarkable name, must have been great-great-grandson of the still living Godgifu. But another name (p. 50) seems to suggest a lost piece of Teutonic song or legend ; " Godwinus Gille, qui vocabatur Godwinus, quia non impar Godwino filio Guthlaci, qui in fabulis antiquonm1 valde prcedicatur," which should be taken along with the mention of the Guthlacingas in Orderic (537 C).
Page 289 - State of the time the scene was so fearful that the contemporary at^he"" writers seem to lack words to set forth its full horrors. timeMen, women, and children died of hunger ; they laid them down and died in the roads and in the fields, and there was no man to bury them.3 Those who survived kept up life on strange and unwonted food.
Page 705 - The king then dictated a letter to Lanfranc, setting forth his wishes with regard to the kingdom. He sealed it and gave it to his son William, and bade him, with his last blessing and his last kiss, to cross at once into England. William Rufus straightway set forth for Witsand, and there heard of his father's death. Meanwhile Henry, too, left his father's bedside to take for himself the money that was left to him, to see that nothing was lacking in its weight, to call together his comrades on whom...

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