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charitable benefactions from archbishop Palliser and others, A.D. 1687. to the poor of this parish, after being laid out in a turnpike security, was, by a resolution of the select vestry in 1788, again called in, and expended in re-building the hospital called Maison Dieu.

The entry runs as follows:

Memorandum.-Wee the minister, churchwardens, and over- Palliser's seers of the poor of the parish of North Allerton, in the North Charity. Riding of the county of Yorke: doe hereby acknowledge that we have the day and yeare above mentioned received from the hands of Mr. James Whiston, of Beedall, in the said Riding, the sum of twenty pounds, being the guift of Dr. William Palliser, now the most Reverend Father in God his Grace the Lordarchbishop of Cassell, in the kingdom of Ireland, to the poore of the parish of Northallerton, which had the honour to have the said archbishop instructed in his first school education in it, whose will and pleasure is that the said sume of twenty pounds should be putt out to interest in a safe hand, and the person who borrows the sume to finde two sufficient bondsmen for the greater security of the said money till it can be secured upon land, which the said archbishop desires may be done as soone as conveniently it can by the said minister, churchwardens, and overseers of the poore, or their successors, who are also to receive the interest of the said twenty pounds yearly, and every year; and to distribute the same every Christmas Day to the most needfull poore of the said parish, according to their discressions. The said sum of twenty pounds to remain a fund for the use of the said poore for ever.

And we beseech Allmighty God who takes such charity as done unto himselfe to recompense it an hundredfold into the donors bosome."

Amongst the churchwarden's accounts for 1687, the Curious entry. following entries appear :-Given to a poore gentlewoman, 2s. 6d. ; paid the spirituall men their fees, 2s. 6d.

1688.

At the general quarter sessions of the peace for the NorthRiding, held at Northallerton, by adjournment, the 17th July, A loyal 1688, the justices there assembled addressed king James II., address. to express their joy and gratitude "for the great blessing God Almighty had bestowed on his sacred majesty and the kingdom, by the happy birth of his royal highness the prince of Wales." They not only congratulate with him, as they say, for this blessing, but pray and wish for his long life and health, and the increase of his royal family; that after ages might know and enjoy an equality of that peace and plenty; in which they, through his wise and just government, (to the envy of their neighbours), then flourished.* A few

* Gazette.

A.D. 1680.

1686.

The above letter is thus spoken of in "An address to the Honourable City of London and all the Shires and Corporations, concerning their choice of a New Parliament, &c." "Give me leave to insert a President worthy both the consideration and imitation of all the Shires and Corporations in England; it is a most generous letter written since this late Prorogation from the honest burgesses of Northallerton, to their representatives whose Worth and Loyalty deserve Immortal Fame, and to be recorded as an honourable example both now and hereafter, for all other Boroughs."

John Harper, M.A., became vicar of Northallerton in John Harper. 1686. He was formerly vicar of Berwick-upon-Tweed. He died in 1694.

Thomas Smelt

1687. Archbishop Palliser.

On November 19th, 1686, Mr. Thomas Smelt, master of the Northallerton grammar school, was buried in the parish church-yard. "He was," says Dr. Hickes, "the best master the school ever had; and, although he had not received a university education, he was an excellent grammarian, both of Latin and Greek, diligent in his office, and vigilant in his care and observation of the boys. He was, nevertheless, much given to drink. Sometimes he would drink two days together; but he kept his school in such excellent order, and his scholars made such proficiency under him, that the town overlooked this fault in him, and valued him as a blessing sent from God, there being in those parts none comparable to him for the instruction of youth. He was also a great loyalist and cavalier, though he concealed his principles, which upon some occasions, however, would discover themselves in the school. North Alverton being a noted thoroughfare on the northern road through which part of the army of those times, both horse and foot, did often march; and we observed that as soon as he heard the sound of a drum or trumpet, his countenance did always fall, and it usually was a good while before he could recollect himself and reform his disordered looks. The officers would sometimes come to beg play-days, but he would never grant it; and once one of Cromwell's great commanders, whose name I have forgot, lying in the town, he sent one of the officers in his name to beg a playday, but as I remember he would not grant it, and coming to the knowledge of the boys, who went to petition the majorgeneral (Lambert) to make that request to him (Mr. Smelt), chastised them in a most severe manner, and had like to have turned them out of school."*

By an entry in the register book of charities, copied from another book of accounts, it appears that the sum of £20 which was subsequently increased to £100, by several

* Vide Dr. Hickes' Life of Kettlewell,

charitable benefactions from archbishop Palliser and others, A.D. 1687. to the poor of this parish, after being laid out in a turnpike security, was, by a resolution of the select vestry in 1788, again called in, and expended in re-building the hospital called Maison Dieu.

The entry runs as follows:-
:-

Memorandum.-Wee the minister, churchwardens, and over- Palliser's seers of the poor of the parish of North Allerton, in the North Charity. Riding of the county of Yorke: doe hereby acknowledge that we have the day and yeare above mentioned received from the hands of Mr. James Whiston, of Beedall, in the said Riding, the sum of twenty pounds, being the guift of Dr. William Palliser, now the most Reverend Father in God his Grace the Lordarchbishop of Cassell, in the kingdom of Ireland, to the poore of the parish of Northallerton, which had the honour to have the said archbishop instructed in his first school education in it, whose will and pleasure is that the said sume of twenty pounds should be putt out to interest in a safe hand, and the person who borrows the sume to finde two sufficient bondsmen for the greater security of the said money till it can be secured upon land, which the said archbishop desires may be done as soone as conveniently it can by the said minister, churchwardens, and overseers of the poore, or their successors, who are also to receive the interest of the said twenty pounds yearly, and every year; and to distribute the same every Christmas Day to the most needfull poore of the said parish, according to their discressions. The said sum of twenty pounds to remain a fund for the use of the said poore for ever.

And we beseech Allmighty God who takes such charity as done unto himselfe to recompense it an hundredfold into the donors bosome."

Amongst the churchwarden's accounts for 1687, the Curious entry. following entries appear:-Given to a poore gentlewoman, 2s. 6d. ; paid the spirituall men their fees, 2s. 6d.

1688.

At the general quarter sessions of the peace for the NorthRiding, held at Northallerton, by adjournment, the 17th July, A loyal 1688, the justices there assembled addressed king James II., address. to express their joy and gratitude "for the great blessing God Almighty had bestowed on his sacred majesty and the kingdom, by the happy birth of his royal highness the prince of Wales." They not only congratulate with him, as they say, for this blessing, but pray and wish for his long life and health, and the increase of his royal family; that after ages might know and enjoy an equality of that peace and plenty; in which they, through his wise and just government, (to the envy of their neighbours), then flourished.* A few

* Gazette.

A.D. 1688. months after the presenting of this loyal address, the king, with his queen and infant son, was compelled to desert his throne and kingdom. The pretender, introduced by Swift in lines on the prayer prepared by the bishops of Chester, (Thomas Cartwright,) Peterborough, (Thomas White,) and Durham, (the hon. Nathaniel Crewe,)

The Lord
Wharton
Charity.

1694.

Charles Neile.

The Kettle

Two Toms and Nat, in council were sat

To rig up a new thanksgiving,

With a dainty fine prayer, for the birth of an heir,
That's neither dead nor living.

Philip, fourth lord Wharton, by deed appropriated the clear yearly rents, issues, and profits, arising from time to time out of Synithwaite and other lands in the county of York, as a perpetual fund for the purchasing yearly 1050 bibles for the use of the poor of Northallerton, Bedale, Thirsk, and Boroughbridge. The ninth clause recites "That there be 10 catechisms and as many bibles delivered each year to so many poor children in the above-mentioned places, and that on the day of delivery of the bibles there shall be sermons preached." The child, before it shall receive, or be entitled to receive the book, shall be taught to read and be able to say by heart the catechism and some of the prayers therewith sent, according to the establishment of the church of England, as well as the 1st, 15th, 25th, 37th, 101st, 113th, and 145th psalms; the name and age of the child to be written in the book.

Charles Neile, M.A., was instituted to the vicarage of Northallerton, in 1694. He was a minor canon of Durham; and died in 1718.

By an indenture of lease, dated March 9th, 1694, John well Charity. Kettlewell conveyed to Leonard Smelt and five others a messuage and farm commonly called "Low Fields," situate within the township of Brompton, in the parish of Northallerton, upon trust, from time to time, to suffer the minister for the time being of the town and parish of Northallerton, and two good and substantial inhabitants of the town and parish of Northallerton and Brompton to receive the rents and profits of the said premises, and to dispose of and apply the same as follows:

Religious
Books.

"To lay out yearly, or as often as need shall require, the sum of £2 10s., part of the said rent, in buying bibles, common prayer books, or such like books of practical divinity as the minister and incumbent for the time being should think most convenient, to be distribuied among such poor inhabitants of the said towns as could read, and by reason of their poverty could not buy such books for themselves; and after the poorest and most indigent were furnished therewith,

A.D. 1694

then for providing the like for others of the said towns that might want them, and who should be thought persons likely to make a good and proper use of such books. To employ, if there should be occasion, a yearly sum of £5 in physic, and Physic. things necessary in the recovery of the health of such poor persons of the said townships, as by reason of their poverty were exempt from payment to the church and poor, or for such other persons of the said townships as were really poor and sick, and not able to be at the charge of physic and things necessary. To employ the yearly sum of £5 for Clothes. clothes for such poor widows or widowers, or other poor housekeepers within the said townships as were in want, and had been industrious, and constantly frequenters of the church, and of sober and peaceable demeanour, such clothing to be provided and delivered before November 1st, yearly. To employ £4 yearly in teaching and instructing the children Education. of such poor people aforesaid; the girls to read English intelligibly, and to knit and sew so as to render them capable of getting an honest livelihood; and the boys to be taught to read and to write, and cast accounts so as to qualify them for being bailiffs or servants to gentlemen, or to be set out to some honest trade. To employ the yearly sum of £6 for Sundry setting out yearly one boy, the son of some poor person objects. inhabiting within one of the said townships, such as should be fatherless or motherless, if both, to have the preference, and always one who could say the church catechism, and could read, write, and cast accounts as aforesaid, and upon further trust, that in case there should be any surplus of the said rents, after the several trusts aforesaid should have been performed, or in case there should not be occasion yearly to lay out so much on any one of the particular purposes aforesaid, to lay out and employ the same to such other of the purposes aforesaid, as the said minister and said two inhabitants, or any two of them, should think fit, or else in furnishing some apprentice in one of the said townships, or one who had served his apprenticeship out of one of the said townships, if he was set out by virtue of that trust towards setting him up in his trade, and buying him work tools, so as the sum of any one apprentice did not exceed 40s.: and upon further trust, that if it should happen, that if there were any youth of either of the said townships, of piety, parts, and good improvement in school learning, whose friends of themselves were not able to maintain him at either of the universities University of Oxford or Cambridge, but who might be educated there education. by the help of such a sum yearly as this charity might supply, the said minister and trustees when they should see cause, should employ part, or the whole, as need should be, of the yearly rent and profits of the said premises towards

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