Our Own English Bible: Its Translators and Their Work, the Manuscript Period

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F. Griffiths, 1913 - 310 pages
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Page 186 - The kings of the earth set themselves, and the rulers take counsel together, against the Lord, and against his Anointed, saying, Let us break their bands asunder, and cast away their cords from us.
Page 11 - But now farewell. I am going a long way With these thou seest — if indeed I go — (For all my mind is clouded with a doubt) To the island-valley of Avilion; Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow. Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadowed, happy, fair with orchard lawns And bowery hollows crowned with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Page 289 - Thus this brook has conveyed his ashes into Avon, Avon into Severn, Severn into the narrow seas, they into the main ocean; and thus the ashes of Wickliffe are the emblem of his doctrine, which now is dispersed all the world over
Page 256 - That first he wrought, and afterward he taught, Out of the gospel he the wordes caught, And this figure he added yet thereto, That if gold ruste what should iron do ? For if a priest be foul on whom we trust, No wonder is a lewed man to rust...
Page 46 - It is true they followed uncertain rules in their observance of the great festival, as having none to bring them the synodal decrees for the observance of Easter, by reason of their being so far away from the rest of the world ; wherefore they only practised such works of piety and chastity as they could learn from the prophetical, evangelical, and apostolical -writings.
Page 38 - Augustin led, They come — and onward travel without dread, Chanting in barbarous ears a tuneful prayer — Sung for themselves, and those whom they would free ! Rich conquest waits them : — the tempestuous sea Of Ignorance, that ran so rough and high And heeded not the voice of clashing swords...
Page 29 - ... and heard the lamentations of their brethren, who were coupled together like dogs, and dragged away into distant slavery beyond the sea and the mountains. Such incessant alarms must annihilate the pleasures and interrupt the labours of a rural life ; and the Campagna of Rome was speedily reduced to the state of a dreary wilderness, in which the land is barren, the waters are impure, and the air is infectious.
Page 59 - For when the time of his departure drew near, he laboured for the space of fourteen days under a bodily infirmity which seemed to prepare the way, yet so moderate that he could talk and walk the whole time. In his neighbourhood was the house to which those that were sick, and like shortly to die, were carried. He desired the person that attended him, in the evening, as the night came on in which he was to depart this life, to make ready a place there for him to take his rest.
Page 256 - A good man was there of religion, And was a poore Parson of a town; But rich he was of holy thought and work; He was also a learned man, a clerk, That Christes Gospel trewely would preach: His parishens devoutly would he teach. Benign he was, and wonder diligent, And in adversity full patient; And such he was y-proved ofte sithes.
Page 38 - They come — and onward travel without dread, Chanting in barbarous ears a tuneful prayer — Sung for themselves, and those whom they would free! Rich conquest waits them : — the tempestuous sea Of Ignorance, that ran so rough and high And heeded not the voice of clashing swords, These good men humble by a few bare words, And calm with fear of God's divinity.

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