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Oxford University Press, 1916
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Page 182 - How am I then a villain To counsel Cassio to this parallel course, Directly to his good? Divinity of hell! When devils will the blackest sins put on, They do suggest at first with heavenly shows...
Page 142 - Witch. WHEN shall we three meet again, In thunder, lightning, or in rain ? 2 Witch.
Page 182 - But then I sigh, and, with a piece of scripture, Tell them — that God bids us do good for evil : And thus I clothe my naked villany With old odd ends, stol'n forth of holy writ ; And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
Page 143 - Root of hemlock digg'd i' the dark, Liver of blaspheming Jew, Gall of goat and slips of yew Slivered in the moon's eclipse, Nose of Turk and Tartar's lips, Finger of birth-strangled babe Ditch-deliver'd by a drab, Make the gruel thick and slab : Add thereto a tiger's chaudron, For the ingredients of our cauldron.
Page 209 - Things and actions are what they are, and the consequences of them will be what they will be : Why then should we desire to be deceived?
Page 14 - The government of the Union, then (whatever may be the influence of this fact on the case), is, emphatically and truly, a government of the people. In form, and in substance, it emanates from them. Its powers are granted by them, and are to be exercised directly on them, and for their benefit.
Page 143 - Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake ; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog...
Page 345 - So ought men to love their wives as their own bodies; he that loveth his wife loveth himself.
Page 143 - Fair is foul, and foul is fair : Hover through the fog and filthy air.
Page 469 - ... although we think we govern our words, and prescribe it well, loquendum ut vulgus, sentiendum ut sapientes ; yet certain it is that words, as a Tartar's bow, do shoot back upon the understanding of the wisest, and mightily entangle and pervert the judgment.

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