The Chronicles of Enguerrand de Monstrelet;: Containing an Account of the Cruel Civil Wars Between the Houses of Orleans and Burgundy; of the Possession of Paris and Normandy by the English; Their Expulsion Thence; and of Other Memorable Events that Happened in the Kingdom of France, as Well as in Other Countries. A History of Fair Example, and of Great Profit to the French, Beginning at the Year MCCCC. where that of Sir John Froissart Finishes, and Ending at the Year MCCCCLXVII. and Continued by Others to the Year MDXVI.

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, Pater-noster-Row ; and J. White and Company, Fleet-street, 1810
 

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Page 273 - O altitudo divitiarum sapientiae et scientiae Dei ! quam incomprehensibilia sunt judicia ejus, et investigabiles viae ejus...
Page 314 - I will give thanks unto the Lord, according to his righteousness ; and I will praise the name of the Lord most high. Psalm viii. Domine, Dominus noster. OLord, our Governor, how excellent is thy name in all the world; thou that hast set thy glory...
Page 251 - Nunc igitur surge, et procede, et alloquens satisfac servis tuis: juro enim tibi per Dominum, quod si non exieris, ne unus quidem remansurus sit tecum nocte hac: et pejus erit hoc tibi, quam omnia mala, quae venerunt super te ab adolescentia tua usque in praesens.
Page 192 - France at an hotel which she had lately purchased from Montagu, grand master of the king's household, situated very near the Porte Barbette. She had lain in there of a child, which had died shortly after its birth, and had not then accomplished the days of her purification. " Seas, on his seeing the duke, said, by way of deceiving him, ' .My lord, the king sends for you, and you must instantly hasten to him; for he has business of great importance to you and him, which he must communicate to you.
Page 288 - ... by dint of money, bribed four persons, an apostate monk, a knight, an esquire, and a varlet, to whom he gave his own sword, his dagger, and a ring, for them to consecrate to, or more properly speaking, to make use of, in the name of the devil,
Page xxviii - Monstrelet are real history, wherein, notwithstanding its imperfections and omissions, are found all the characteristics of historical writing. He traces events to their source, develops the causes, and traces them with the minutest details ; and what renders these chronicles infinitely precious is, his never-failing attention to report all edicts, declarations, summonses, letters, negotiations, treaties, &c. as justificatory proofs of the truth of the facts he relates. " After the example of Froissart,...
Page xxviii - His work is called Chronicles ; but we must not, however, consider this title in the sense commonly attached to it, which merely conveys the idea of simple annals. The Chronicles of Monstrelet are real history, wherein, notwithstanding its imperfections and omissions, are found all the characteristics of historical writing. He traces events to their source, develops the causes, and traces them with the minutest details; and what...
Page 100 - ... and turn half round. The others made a gallant fight with their opponents, but Sir James de Montenay, throwing down his battle-axe, seized Sir James de Monstarde with one of his hands under his legs, and, raising him up with his dagger in the other, was prepared to stab him ; but, as the affair on all sides seemed to be carried on in earnest, the king put an end to the combat. According to appearances, the Arragonians would have had the worst of it had the combat been carried to extremities,...
Page 206 - We shall say more hereafter respecting these princes, and of the .fortunes that befel them. On the 10th day of December, the duchess of Orleans, widow to the late duke, with her youngest son John, and accompanied by the late queen of England, now wife to her eldest son, set out for Paris. The king of Sicily, the dukes of Berry and Bourbon, the counts of Clermont and...
Page 394 - Os peccatoris et os dolosi super me apertum est, locuti sunt adversum me lingua dolosa, et sermonibus odii circumdederunt me.

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