Readings on the History and System of the Common Law

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Jacob North & Company, 1904 - 404 pages
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Page 214 - International law is part of our law, and must be ascertained and administered by the courts of justice of appropriate jurisdiction, as often as questions of right depending upon it are duly presented for their determination.
Page 35 - By marriage the husband and wife are one person in law ; that is the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband ; under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs everything...
Page 111 - No freeman shall be taken, or imprisoned, or be disseised of his freehold, or liberties, or free customs, or be outlawed or exiled, or any otherwise destroyed ; nor will we pass upon him, nor condemn him, but by lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.
Page 206 - That all men have a natural and indefeasible right to worship Almighty God according to -the dictates of their own consciences ; that no man can, of right, be compelled to attend, erect, or support any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry against his consent; that no human authority can, in any case whatever, control or interfere with the rights of conscience ; and that no preference shall ever be given, by law, to any religious establishments or modes of worship.
Page 6 - That the respective colonies are entitled to the common law of England, and more especially to the great and inestimable privilege of being tried by their peers of the vicinage, according to the course of that law.
Page 13 - It must be conceded that there are such rights in every free government beyond the control of the State. A government which recognized no such rights, which held the lives, the liberty and the property of its citizens subject at all times to the absolute disposition and unlimited control of even the most democratic depository of power, is after all but a despotism. It is true it is a despotism of the many, of the majority, if you choose to call it so, but it is none the less a despotism.
Page 298 - We have commanded you], that within Eight Days after the Service of this Writ on you, inclusive of the Day of such Service, you do cause...
Page 6 - Whereupon the deputies so appointed being now assembled, in a full and free representation of these colonies, taking into their most serious consideration, the best means of attaining the ends aforesaid, do, in the first place, as Englishmen, their ancestors in like cases have usually done, for asserting and vindicating their rights and liberties...
Page 207 - Thou shalt not covet ; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. Love worketh no ill to his neighbor : therefore love is the fulfilling of the law.
Page 301 - The distinction between actions at law and suits in equity, and the forms of all such actions and suits, heretofore existing, are abolished...

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