The Cambridge Companion to Monteverdi

Front Cover
John Whenham, Richard Wistreich
Cambridge University Press, 2007 M12 13
Claudio Monteverdi is one of the most important figures of 'early' music, a composer whose music speaks powerfully and directly to modern audiences. This book, first published in 2007, provides an authoritative treatment of Monteverdi and his music, complementing Paolo Fabbri's standard biography of the composer. Written by leading specialists in the field, it is aimed at students, performers and music-lovers in general and adds significantly to our understanding of Monteverdi's music, his life, and the contexts in which he worked. Chapters offering overviews of his output of sacred, secular and dramatic music are complemented by 'intermedi', in which contributors examine individual works, or sections of works in detail. The book draws extensively on Monteverdi's letters and includes a select discography/videography and a complete list of Monteverdi's works together with an index of first lines and titles.
 

Contents

his cultures and ours
1
Musical sources
20
Monteverdis early works
31
Ecco mormorar londe 1590
45
Monteverdi at Mantua 15901612
53
Spaces for music in late Renaissance Mantua
76
The Mantuan madrigals and the Scherzi musicali
95
Ahi come a un vago sol cortese giro 1605
111
The Venetian sacred music
199
Magnificat SV281 1641
219
Monteverdis late operas
227
Il ritorno dUlisse 1640 Act V scene 10
243
Monteverdi studies and new musicologies
249
Monteverdi in performance
261
Notes
280
Bibliography
299

Orfeo 1607
119
The Mantuan sacred music
141
Laetatus sum 1610
155
Music in Monteverdis Venice
163
The Venetian secular music
179
Lamento della ninfa 1638
195
Selected discography
310
catalogue and index
314
Index of titles and first lines
339
Index of names and subjects
349
Cambridge Companions to Music
359
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Page xx - ... tangled that I give Your Most Illustrious Lordship my word that I labour more than if I were to compose it all by myself; and that if it had to be left to him to write it, it would take time and plenty of it (and if I were not at his heels so much, he would not have done half of what he has done). It is true that the labour is great, and tedious; but still, he is a man who likes to talk things over in company at great length (and about this, I make it a rule to take the opportunity away from...

About the author (2007)

John Whenham is Professor of Music History and Head of the Department of Music, University of Birmingham.

Richard Wistreich is Senior Lecturer and Head of Performance at the International Centre for Music Studies, Newcastle University.

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