The reign of William the Conquereror. 1871

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Clarendon Press, 1871
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Contents

August
29
January Williams first progress his regrants and alms 3132
31
William withdraws to Barking
43
Williams dealings with the New Minster 5759
57
February
76
1069April
86
April 8 1067 William keeps Easter at Fécamp
90
1071
94
CHAPTER XVIII
99
1068
100
town
111
Help sought in foreign lands state of Germany
119
Jealousy between William and Philip
125
Christmas Gospatric buys the Earldom of Northumberland
130
Flight of Æthelsige Scotland appointed Abbot
135
He goes back to Normandy
145
the city
156
December 25 William keeps Christmas at Westminster further
167
77
168
pressions of the Sheriff Urse he is rebuked
179
He receives Eadgar and his sisters at Wearmouth
195
Bristol subject to William
200
William Malet
204
Comparatively favourable treatment of Lincoln
215
II
219
William reaches Cambridge early history of the town
220
CHAPTER XIX
223
The Revolt and Final Conquest of the North
234
Ralph encamps at Cambridge he flies to Norwich
239
February William marches to Salisbury and reviews his army
240
The second castle built and intrusted to William Fitz
241
June 1 1070 Turold sets out to take possession he reaches
243
Ralph flies to Denmark and thence to Britanny
247
Probable objects of Swend
249
The fleet enters the Humber it is joined by Eadgar
254
William returns arrest of Waltheof
257
The Danes and English march on York the city
271
Devonshire
272
William conquers Staffordshire and marches
283
They are defeated by Count Brian no further men
288
Dec 25 1069 He keeps Christmas at York settlement of York
296
Ralph condemned by default cruel punishment
309
A D
321
The Councils of the Year 1070
328
Æthelric seized and Æthelwine outlawed
336
Swend at last sends help description of his force
337
May 2331 Whitsun Gemót at Windsor appointment and history
340
Volunteers from other districts story of Blæcman
341
April 1 1081 Accession of Alexios Komnenos Robert Wiscard
342
124
347
79
348
10701089
349
1217
361
1084
363
Death of Abbot Brand of Peterborough succession
366
Ecclesiastical scheme of Lanfranc his works
367
1077
369
Pauls
375
Deposition of Æthelmær
382
Wulfstans management of his diocese foundation
383
May 31
385
1071
391
8081
392
Eadwine succeeded by Geoffrey
401
Succession of Abbots consecration of the church
412
English and continental sees
415
1074
423
221222
429
1073
433
1082
436
the schism
437

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Page 708 - The king then dictated a letter to Lanfranc, setting forth his wishes with regard to the kingdom. He sealed it and gave it to his son William, and bade him, with his last blessing and his last kiss, to cross at once into England. William Rufus straightway set forth for Witsand, and there heard of his father's death. Meanwhile Henry, too, left his father's bedside to take for himself the money that was left to him, to see that nothing was lacking in its weight, to call together his comrades on whom...
Page 316 - The alms of the settlement, in this dreadful exigency, were certainly .liberal ; and all was done by charity that private charity could do ; but it was a people in beggary ; it was a nation which stretched out its hands for food.
Page 508 - Never indeed was any man more contented with doing his duty in that state of life to which it had pleased God to call him.
Page 691 - ... from the shire. Also he had a record made of how much land his archbishops had, and his bishops and his abbots and his earls...
Page 691 - So very narrowly he caused it to be " traced out, that there was not a single hide, nor one virgate of land, nor even, " it is shame to tell. though it seemed to him no shame to do, an ox, nor a cow, " nor a swine was left, that was not set down.
Page 433 - Legatus tuus, religiose pater, ad me veniens ex tua parte, me admonuit, ut tibi et successoribus tuis fidelitatem facerem, et de pecunia quam antecessores mei ad Romanam ecclesiam mittere solebant melius cogitarem. Unum admisi, alterum non admisi ; fidelitatem facere nolui, nee volo, quia nee ego promisi nee antecessores meos antecessoribus tuis id fecisse comperio.
Page 396 - God, craving his mildness,2 for that they could get no mildness from men. What may we say, but that they shot sorely, and that others brake down the doors there, and went in, and slew some of the monks to death, and many wounded therein, so that the blood came from the altar upon the grees and from the grees upon the floor.3 Three were slain to death and eighteen were wounded.
Page 619 - King let it to that man's hands that bade most of all ; and he recked not how very sinfully the reeves got it of poor men, nor how many unlaws they -did. And as man spake more of right law, so man did more unlaw. They reared up unright tolls, and many other unright things they did that are hard to reckon.
Page 708 - ... whom he could trust, and to take measures for stowing the treasure in a place of safety. And now those who stood around the dying king began to implore his mercy for the captives whom he held in prison. He granted the prayer. . . . The last earthly acts of the Conqueror were now done. He had striven to...
Page 711 - The great men mounted their horses and rode with all speed to their own homes, to guard their houses and goods against the outburst of lawlessness which was sure to break forth now that the land had no longer a ruler. Their servants and followers, seeing their lords gone, and deeming that there was no longer any fear of punishment, began to make spoil of the royal chamber. Weapons, clothes, vessels, the royal...

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