A Textbook in the History of Modern Elementary Education: With Emphasis on School Practice in Relation to Social Conditions, Issue 11

Front Cover
Ginn, 1912 - 505 pages
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Contents

Elementary schools in England after the Reformation
52
15
55
Church and neighborhood schools prevailed in Pennsylvania
62
18
65
Narrow intellectual life a factor in narrow curriculum
71
Primers replaced by spelling books 17401800
77
Arithmetic common but not universal in colonial curricula
83
Two thirds of time wasted through poor equipment and methods
91
IMPROVED CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT BRETHREN
94
La Salles practical innovation of simultaneous class instruction
101
Routine drill superior to habituation to shiftlessness
107
Modern scientific method The inductive verification of hypotheses
114
English science popularized in France by Voltaire
121
Democracy furnished a nonreligious basis for universal education
130
Comenius theory of universal encyclopedic vernacular education
136
Occasional instances of reforms of vernacular schools on Comenian
148
Aims of education secular but not irreligious
154
CHAPTER VIII
161
Rousseaus life and character
172
Idealized romantic love and simple domestic life
178
Influence of the Emile on subsequent practice to be emphasized
185
Physical activity essential in the maturing of children
191
Present interest curiosity and utility furnish motives for study
201
Bibliographical notes
207
Salzmanns System of Gymnastic Training An illustration from
213
Rochow
215
Fundamental Prussian legal code 1794 defined schools as state
223
Voluntary agencies depended on for elementary schools for poor
229
Social changes of eighteenth century prepared for educational reform
237
New York City Schools developed by voluntary philanthropic
242
Public taxsupported schools made optional 1834
248
Horace Mann secretary of Massachusetts Board of Education 1837
258
24
264
Bibliographical notes
271

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Page 134 - A popular government without popular information or the means of acquiring it is but a prologue to a farce or a tragedy, or, perhaps, both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.
Page 261 - It shall be the duty of the General assembly, as soon as circumstances will permit, to provide, by law, for a general system of education, ascending in a regular gradation, from township schools to a state university, wherein tuition shall be gratis, and equally open to all.
Page 8 - God of God, Light of Light, Very God of very God, Begotten, not made, Being of one substance with the Father ; By whom all things were made : Who for us men, and for our salvation came down from heaven, And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin Mary, And was made man...
Page 365 - Quadruped. Graminivorous. Forty teeth, namely twentyfour grinders, four eye-teeth, and twelve incisive. Sheds coat in the spring ; in marshy countries, sheds hoofs, too. Hoofs hard, but requiring to be shod with iron. Age known by marks in mouth.
Page 60 - ... to take account from time to time of all parents and masters and of their children, concerning their calling and employment of their children, especially of their ability to read and understand the principles of religion and the capital laws of this country...
Page 61 - ... read, whose wages shall be paid either by the parents or masters of such children, or by the inhabitants in general, by way of supply, as the major part of those...
Page 421 - The education of the child must accord both in mode and arrangement with the education of mankind as considered historically; or in other words, the genesis of knowledge in the individual must follow the same course as the genesis of knowledge in the race.
Page 156 - But pray remember children are not to be taught by rules; which will be always slipping out of their memories. What you think necessary for them to do, settle in them by an indispensable practice, as often as the occasion returns ; and, if it be possible, make occasions. This will beget habits in them, which, being once established, operate of themselves, easily and naturally, without the assistance of the memory.
Page 158 - None of the things they are to learn should ever be made a burden to them, or imposed on them as a task. Whatever is so proposed presently becomes irksome : the mind takes an aversion to it, though before it were a thing of delight or indifferency.
Page 127 - Schools and universities are state institutions, charged with the instruction of youth in useful information and scientific knowledge. Such institutions may be founded only with the knowledge and consent of the State. All public schools and educational institutions are .under the supervision of the State, and are at all times subject to its examination and inspection.

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