Theologiæ dogmaticæ tractus ..., Volume 2

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Typis L. Johnson, 1840
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Page 315 - THOSE whom God effectually calleth he also freely justifieth ; not by infusing righteousness into them, but by pardoning their sins, and by accounting and accepting their persons as righteous : not for any thing wrought in them, or done by them, but for Christ's sake alone : not by imputing faith itself, the act of believing, or any other evangelical obedience, to them as their righteousness ; but by imputing the obedience and satisfaction of Christ unto them, they receiving and resting on him and...
Page 61 - Works done before the grace of Christ, and the Inspiration of his Spirit, are not pleasant to God, forasmuch as they spring not of faith in Jesus Christ...
Page 314 - WE are accounted righteous before God, only for the merit of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ by faith, and not for our own works or deservings : wherefore, that we are justified by faith only, is a most wholesome doctrine, and very full of comfort, as more largely is expressed in the Homily of Justification.* XII.
Page 21 - Although, in relation to the foreknowledge and decree of God, the first cause, all things come to pass immutably and infallibly ; yet, by the same providence, he ordereth them to fall out according to the nature of second causes, either necessarily, freely, or contingently.
Page 52 - All mankind by their fall, lost communion with God, are under his wrath and curse, and so made liable to all the miseries of this life, to death itself, and to the pains of hell for ever.
Page 39 - ... is the fault and corruption of the nature of every man, that naturally is engendered of the offspring of Adam, whereby man is very far gone from original righteousness, and is of his own nature inclined to evil, so that the flesh lusteth always contrary to the Spirit; and therefore in every person born into this world, it deserveth God's wrath and damnation.
Page 367 - These angels and men, thus predestinated and foreordained, are particularly and unchangeably designed ; and their number is so certain and definite, that it cannot be either increased or diminished.
Page 14 - The almighty power, unsearchable wisdom, and infinite goodness of God so far manifest themselves in his providence that it extendeth itself even to the first fall, and all other sins of angels and men,' and that not by a bare permission,' but such as hath joined with it a most wise and powerful bounding,' and otherwise ordering and governing of them, in a manifold dispensation, to his own holy ends;' yet so as the sinfulncss thereof proceedeth only from the creature, and not from God ; who, being...
Page 265 - The condition of Man after the fall of Adam is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself, by his own natural strength and good works, to faith, and calling upon God. Wherefore we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
Page 250 - Christ, and therefore, cannot be saved; much less, can men not professing the Christian religion be saved in any other way whatsoever, be they never so diligent to frame their lives according to the light of nature and the law of that religion they do profess; and to assert and maintain that they may, is very pernicious, -and to be detested.

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