Science in Culture

Front Cover
Rodopi, 2007 - 314 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
This book tries to uncover science's discoverer and explain why the conception of science has been changing during the centuries, and why science can be beneficial and dangerous for humanity. Far from being hermetic, this research can be interesting for all who want to understand deeper what really conditions the place of science in culture.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Greece or the East?
3
TWO Why the Greeks?
9
FOUR Philosophys Rise from Sensations to Wisdom
17
FIVE Knowledge and Opinion
23
SIX Theoretical Features of the Object
29
SEVEN Theoretical Justification
37
EIGHT Theoretical Proof
43
THE HELLENISTIC DEFORMATION OF THEORETICAL KNOWLEDGE
51
From the House of Solomon
149
TWENTYFIVE
157
Part
175
TWENTYEIGHT The War against Idols
183
The Evolution of the Concept
189
The World Before Reasons Tribunal
193
Toward a New Age
199
THIRTYFOUR Neopositivism at War with Metaphysics
205

An End Beyond Knowledge
67
TWELVE Aversion to Pagan Authority
77
THIRTEEN Handmaiden to Theology
83
FIFTEEN Metaphysics and Natural Theology
93
SEVENTEEN The Problem of the Continuity of Science
103
EIGHTEEN The Problem of Experimental Science
109
NINETEEN The Mathematization of Scientific Knowledge
117
TWENTYONE The Quest for an Earthly Paradise
129
TWENTYTHREE The Influence of the East
139
THIRTYSIX What is Culture?
219
THIRTYEIGHT Ends Limits and Directions in
227
Notes
233
Bibliography
259
About the Author
275
Index of Authors Editors and Translators
289
Index of Subjects
295
Index of Names
311
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Europe are full of spirit, but wanting in intelligence and skill ; and therefore they keep their freedom, but have no political organization, and are incapable of ruling over others. Whereas the natives of Asia are intelligent and inventive, but they are wanting in spirit, and therefore they are always in a state of subjection and slavery.

Bibliographic information