A Discourse on the Study of the Law of Nature and Nations

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Pratt, 1843 - 103 pages
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Page 99 - Le droit des gens est naturellement fondé sur ce principe, que les diverses nations doivent se faire dans la paix le plus de bien, et dans la guerre le moins de mal qu'il est possible , sans nuire à leurs véritables intérêts.
Page xxiv - ... if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits, how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant to participate of the wisdom, illuminations, and inventions, the one of the other?
Page 49 - Wherefore that here we may briefly end : of Law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power : both Angels and men and creatures of what condition soever, though each in different sort and manner, yet all with uniform consent, admiring her as the mother of their peace and joy.
Page 48 - Romae, alia Athenis, alia nunc, alia posthac, sed et omnes gentes et omni tempore " una lex et sempiterna et immutabilis continebit unusque erit communis quasi " magister et imperator omnium deus: ille legis hujus inventor, disceptator, lator, cui " qui non parebit, ipse se fugiet ac naturam hominis aspernatus hoc ipso luet maximas " poenas, etiam si caetera supplicia quae putantur, effugerit.
Page xix - Allow me in justice to her memory to tell you what she was, and what I owed her. I was guided in my choice only by the blind affection of my youth. I found an intelligent companion, and a tender friend, a prudent monitress, the most faithful of wives, and a mother as tender as children ever had the misfortune to lose. I met a woman who, by the tender management of my weaknesses, gradually corrected the most pernicious of them. She became prudent...
Page 54 - ... historian, a scholar, a poet, and a divine ; a disinterested statesman, a philosophical lawyer, a patriot who united moderation with firmness, and a theologian who was taught candour by his learning. Unmerited exile did not damp his patriotism ; the bitterness of controversy did not extinguish his charity. The sagacity...
Page 95 - I am loth to quote, yet inasmuch as the laws of all nations are doubtless raised out of the ruins of the civil law, as all governments are sprung out of the ruins of the Roman Empire, it must be owned that the principles of our law are borrowed from the civil law and therefore grounded upon the same reason in many things.
Page 87 - It were good therefore that men in their innovations would follow the example of time itself, which indeed innovateth greatly, but quietly and by degrees scarce to be perceived...
Page 99 - That different nations ought, in time of peace, to do one another all the good they can, and, in time of war, as little harm as possible, without prejudice to their own real interests.
Page 43 - Rev. iv. 6. from the soils through which they run, so do civil laws vary according to the regions and governments where they are planted, though they proceed from the same fountains.

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