Introduction to the Study of International Law: Designed as an Aid in Teaching and in Historical Studies

Front Cover
Sampson Low, Marston, Low & Searle, 1875 - 383 pages
 

Contents

Laws and usages of war somewhat vague yet improving Causes of this
124
Other modes of confirming the faith of treaties Hostages Pledges
131
The neutral may admit into his ports war vessels of the belligerents
159
5 Treatment
160
161 2 Furnishing troops to belligerents
161
co coxo com 162 What may a neutrals subject
162
Rights of neutrals Case of the Caroline
163
Continued
164
Municipal laws enforcing neutrality
165
Of Civil Wars Wars with Savages Piracy and the Slave Trade
167
Who are neutrals and what is neutral property?
168
169a General principles as to liability of goods to capture 1696 Nationality of goods and vessels as affecting their liability to capture 170 Treatment o...
170
Justice of the rules respecting neutral trade considered
171
Former practice in regard to neutral trade
172
Of Capture and Recapture Occupation and Recovery of Territory
173
Continued
174
Declaration attached to the peace of Paris in 1856
176
Neutral property in armed enemies vessels
177
Contraband of
178
What goods are contraband in the usage of nations?
179
Results as to deciding what articles are contraband Occasional contraband
180
Is it just and sanctioned by usage? Opinions in respect to
181
Preemption English practice in cases of preemption
182
Penalty for contraband at sea Treaty modifying the penalty
183
Of the Suspension and Close of War especially of Truce and Peace
184
Trade closed in peace but open in
185
Blockade What places can be blockaded? Why is a breach of blockade unlawful? Validity of a blockade Paper or cabinet blockades un lawful
186
Evidence of a blockade What is due notice? What is a discontinuance of a blockade
187
Penalty for breach of blockade Duration of liability to penalty
188
Attempts to stretch the doctrine of blockade Prussian decree decree First and second orders in council Milan decree in council of 1809
189
The right of search Its narrow limits Duty of submitting to it Treaties often regulate the right
190
CHAPTER II
191
Its justice considered Historical illustrations
192
Neutrals under belligerent convoy
193
Search during peace to execute revenue laws
194
56
288
57
318
Selection of works relating to international
339
INDEX
369
coxoxos
375
Straits and inland seas The Danish straits
1
International law what in a wider sense?
3
Actual international law what?
5
Its genesis and voluntary nature It is of later growth than state
6
Why it arose in Christian states Quite imperfect elsewhere Illustrations of this from Greece and Rome Not true that these nations had no international l...
7
Names given to this science Not the same as jus gentium
9
Differs from jus naturale
10
Definition of jus naturale by Grotius
11
Puffendorf confounds jus naturale and international
12
A reference to the standard of justice necessary in international
13
It cannot be resolved into contract obligation
14
Must be looked at both as a positive law and in its relations to jus and morals Its jural grounds
15
Its moral grounds
16
Particular rights and obligations of nations
17
Observations on certain rights 1 The right of reputation
18
The right of redress
19
4 Is there a right of conquest?
21
Moral relations or duties and moral claims of states
22
Observations on certain duties 1 Humanity
23
Comity
24
Intercourse
25
Vattels Wheatons and other divisions of international
26
Custom and free assent alike sources of international law Thus morai claims become rights
28
International law adopted by municipal
29
Aids for ascertaining what international law
30
Stages in the development of international
31
Minor differences in the views of different nations concerning
32
Uncertainty and want of authority in international
33
Importance of the history of international
34
Method pursued in this work
35

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 37 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 302 - Parma, the colony or province of Louisiana, with the same extent that it now has in the hands of Spain, and that it had when France possessed it, and such as it should be after the treaties subsequently entered into between Spain and other States.
Page 211 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective — that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 352 - ... part of any province or people, or in the service of, or for, or under, or in aid of any person or persons exercising or assuming to exercise the powers of government in or over any foreign country, colony, province, or part of any province or people...
Page 334 - Secondly, not to permit or suffer either belligerent to make use of its ports or waters as the. base of naval operations against the other, or for the purpose of the renewal or augmentation of military supplies or arms, or the recruitment of men. Thirdly, to exercise due diligence in its own ports and waters, and, as to all persons within its jurisdiction, to prevent any violation of the foregoing obligations and duties.
Page 216 - But there is nothing in our laws, or in the law of nations, that forbids our citizens from sending armed vessels, as well as munitions of war, to foreign ports for sale. It is a commercial adventure which no nation is bound to prohibit, and which only exposes the persons engaged in it to the penalty of confiscation.
Page 334 - ... carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace ; and also to use like diligence to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such vessel having been specially adapted, in whole or in part, within such jurisdiction, to warlike use.
Page 155 - Thou shalt not smite them: wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword and with thy bow? set bread and water before them, that they may eat and drink, and go to their master.
Page 350 - An Act to regulate the conduct of Her Majesty's subjects during the existence of hostilities between foreign States with which Her Majesty is at peace.
Page 224 - ... as any other goods found therein, which by this treaty are to be esteemed free, neither may they be detained on pretence of their being as it were infected by the prohibited goods, much less shall they be confiscated, as lawful prize...

Bibliographic information