The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon: Including All His Occasional Works Namely Letters Speeches Tracts State Papers Memorials Devices and All Authentic Writings Not Already Printed Among His Philosophical Literary Or Professional Works, Volume 3

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1868
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Page 144 - He bade me take no care for that, and pressed it : whereupon I said : My Lord, I see I must be your homager, and hold land of your gift ; but do you know the manner of doing homage in law ? always it is with a saving of his faith to the King and his other Lords ; and therefore, my Lord (said I), I can be no more yours than I was, and it must be with the ancient savings : and if I grow to be a rich man, you will give me leave to give it back to some of your unrewarded followers.
Page 5 - I have written is to a good end, that is, to the more decent carriage of my master's service, and to our particular better understanding one of another. This letter, if it shall be answered by you in deed, and not in word, I suppose it will not be worse for us both ¡ else it is but a few lines lost, which for a much smaller matter I would have adventured. So this being to yourself, I for my part rest [Before June, 1606.] LXXXVI.
Page 253 - I do willingly acknowledge; and, amongst the rest, this great one that led the rest ; that knowing myself by inward calling to be fitter to hold a book, than to play a part, I have led my life in civil causes ; for which I was not very fit by nature, and more unfit by the preoccupation of my mind.
Page 119 - ... quarter of an hour or better, and in the whole some two hours : and so the exercise being begun and concluded with prayer, and the president giving a text for the next meeting, the assembly was dissolved. And this was, as I take it, a fortnight's exercise; which, in my opinion, was the best way to frame and train up preachers to handle the word of God as it ought to be handled, that hath been practised.
Page 84 - Believing that I was born for the service of mankind, and regarding the care of the commonwealth as a kind of common property which like the air and the water belongs to everybody, I set myself to consider in what way mankind might be best served, and what service I was myself best fitted by nature to perform.
Page 160 - ... nay, and after it was set to print, the queen, who, as your lordship knoweth, as she was excellent in great matters, so she was exquisite in small, and noted that I could not forget my ancient respect to my Lord of Essex, in terming him ever my Lord of Essex, my Lord of Essex, almost in every page of the book, which she thought not fit, but would have it made Essex, or the late Earl of Essex : whereupon of force it was printed "de novo," and the first copies suppressed by her peremptory commandment.
Page 144 - Bacon, the queen hath denied me the place for you, and hath placed another ; I know you are the least part of your own matter, but you fare ill because you have chosen me for your mean and dependence ; you have spent your time and thoughts in my matters ; I die," these were his very words, " if I do not somewhat towards your fortune : you shall not deny to accept a piece of land which I will bestow upon you.
Page 301 - Wherefore, since I have only taken upon me to ring a bell to call other wits together, (which is the meanest office,) it cannot but be consonant to my desire, to have that bell heard as far as can be.
Page 150 - And when her majesty hastily asked me, Wherein ? I told her, the author had committed very apparent theft; for he had taken most of the sentences of Cornelius Tacitus, and translated them into English, and put them into his text.
Page 158 - I was but once with the Queen; at what time, though I durst not deal directly for my Lord as things then stood, yet generally I did both commend her Majesty's mercy, terming it to her as an excellent balm that did continually distil from her sovereign hands, and made an excellent odour in the senses of her people...

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