Caloric: Its Mechanical, Chemical, and Vital Agencies in the Phenomena of Nature, Volume 1

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W. Pickering, 1843
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Page 480 - Ring out, ye crystal spheres ! Once bless our human ears (If ye have power to touch our senses so), And let your silver chime Move in melodious time ; And let the bass of heaven's deep organ blow; And with your ninefold harmony Make up full consort to the angelic symphony.
Page ii - Thus calmly spake the venerable Sage, " An active Principle : — howe'er removed From sense and observation, it subsists In all things, in all natures ; in the stars Of azure heaven, the unenduring clouds, In flower and tree, in every pebbly stone That paves the brooks, the stationary rocks, The moving waters, and the invisible air.
Page 259 - That very law* which moulds a tear, And bids it trickle from its source, That law preserves the earth a sphere, And guides the planets in their course.
Page 468 - Let us adore the supremacy of that divine Sun, the Godhead, who illuminates all, who recreates all, from whom all proceed, to whom all must return, whom we invoke to direct our understandings aright in our progress towards his holy seat.
Page 28 - Some say, he bid his angels turn askance The poles of earth, twice ten degrees and more, From the sun's axle ; they with labour push'd Oblique the centric globe.
Page 20 - The wind goeth toward the south, and turneth about unto the north; it whirleth about continually, and the wind returneth again according to his circuits.
Page 518 - To every form of being is assigned An active principle, howe'er removed From sense and observation ; it subsists In all things, in all natures, in the stars Of azure heaven, the unenduring clouds, In flower and tree, and every pebbly stone That paves the brooks, the stationary rocks, The moving waters, and the invisible air.
Page 474 - The earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep.
Page 16 - I wish we could derive the rest of the phenomena of Nature by the same kind of reasoning from mechanical principles, for I am induced by many reasons to suspect that they...
Page 161 - And to shew that I do not take Gravity for an essential Property of Bodies, I have added one Question concerning its Cause, chusing to propose it by way of a Question, because I am not yet satisfied about it for want of Experiments.

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