A commonplace book of thoughts, memories and fancies, original and selected

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Virtue, 1877 - 371 pages
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Page 81 - It is a shameful and unblessed thing to take the scum of people, and wicked condemned men, to be the people with whom you plant; and not only so, but it spoileth the plantation; for they will ever live like rogues, and not fall to work, but be lazy, and do mischief, and spend victuals, and be quickly weary, and then certify over to their country to the discredit of the plantation.
Page 85 - Who, doomed to go in company with Pain And Fear and Bloodshed (miserable train!), Turns his necessity to glorious gain; In face of these doth exercise a power Which is our human nature's highest dower; Controls them and subdues, transmutes, bereaves Of their bad influence and their good receives...
Page 15 - ... shall a trumpet be blown in the city, and the people not be afraid? shall there be evil in a city, and the Lord hath not done it?
Page 23 - A single life doth well with churchmen, for charity will hardly water the ground where it must first fill a pool.
Page 344 - And she said unto him, My father, if thou hast opened thy mouth unto the LORD, do to me according to that which hath proceeded out of thy mouth; forasmuch as the LORD hath taken vengeance for thee of thine enemies, even of the children of Ammon.
Page 336 - Are mourned by man, and not by man alone, As fondly he believes. Upon the side Of Hellespont (such faith was entertained) A knot of spiry trees for ages grew...
Page 4 - Our Life is turned Out of her course, wherever Man is made An offering, or a sacrifice, a tool Or implement, a passive Thing employed As a brute mean, without acknowledgment Of common right or interest in the end; Used or abused, as selfishness may prompt.
Page 187 - For rhetoric, he could not ope His mouth, but out there flew a trope ; And when he happened to break off I...
Page 86 - More skilful in self-knowledge, even more pure, As tempted more ; more able to endure, As more exposed to suffering and distress ; Thence, also, more alive to tenderness.
Page 267 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think, The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.

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