The History of the English Bible

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University Press, 1912 - 136 pages
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Page 104 - Bible as well as King James's. The Translators in King James's time took an excellent way. That Part of the Bible was given to him who was most excellent in such a Tongue (as the Apocrypha to Andrew Downs) and then they met together, and one read the Translation, the rest holding in their Hands some Bible, either of the learned Tongues, or French, Spanish, Italian, &c. If they found any Fault, they spoke; if not, he read on.
Page 123 - ... 4. That in such necessary changes, the style of the language employed in the existing Version be closely followed. '•'5. That it is desirable that Convocation should nominate a body of its own members to undertake the work of revision, who shall be at liberty to invite the co-operation of any eminent for scholarship, to whatever nation or religious body they may belong.
Page 56 - I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: thy years are throughout all generations. Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens are the work of thy hands. They shall perish, but thou shalt endure: yea, all of them shall wax old like a garment; as a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall have no end
Page 41 - I defer to speak at this time and understood at the last not only that there was no room in my lord of London's palace to translate the new testament, but also that there was no place to do it in all England, as experience doth now openly declare.
Page 132 - A description of the Great Bible, 1539, and the six editions of Cranmer's Bible, 1540 and 1541, printed by Grafton and Whitchurch; also of the editions, in large folio, of the authorized version of the Holy Scriptures, printed in the years 1611, 1613, 1617, 1634, 1640.
Page 107 - Translation it is that openeth the window, to let in the light; that breaketh the shell, that we may eat the kernel; that putteth aside the curtain, that we may look into the most holy place; that removeth the cover of the well, that we may come by the water...
Page 39 - If God spare my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plough shall know more of the Scripture than thou dost.
Page 109 - And she lay at his feet until the morning: and she rose up before one could know another. And he said, Let it not be known that a woman came into the floor. Also he said, Bring the vail that thou hast upon thee, and hold it. And when she held it, he measured six measures of barley, and laid it on her : and she went into the city.
Page 107 - Bible being laid as the general basis of the whole work. " Truly," say the translators, who were too great for the pretentiousness of a false independence, " we never thought, from the beginning, that we should need to make a new Translation, nor yet to make of a bad one a good one ; but to make a good one better, or out of many good ones, one principal good one.
Page 61 - Henry's authority, without any formal ecclesiastical decision, the book was given to the English people, which is the foundation of the text of our present Bible. From Matthew's Bible — itself a combination of the labours of Tyndale and Coverdale — all later revisions have been successively formed. In that the general character and mould of our whole version was definitely fixed. The labours of the next seventy-five years were devoted to improving it in detail.

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