Mathematical Models of Distribution Channels

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, 2004 M10 29 - 568 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

Mathematical Models of Distribution Channels identifies eight "Channel Myths" that characterize almost all analytical research on distribution channels. The authors prove that models that incorporate one or more Channel Myths generate distorted conclusions; they also develop a methodology that will enable researchers to avoid falling under the influence of any Channel Myth.

At the heart of their analysis is a single-manufacturer/multiple-retailer meta-model that embraces any degree of inter-retailer competition and any distribution of market shares. In Chapters 1 and 2 the authors provide an introduction to the current, analytical literature on distribution channels, and they present an intuitively appealing prologue to the Channel Myths that are developed rigorously in later Chapters. In Chapters 3, 4, and 10 they extend the literature by ascertaining the relationship between the manufacturer-optimal wholesale-price strategy and channel breadth. Specific analyses include multiple, non-competing retailers, multiple states-of-nature, and multiple, competing retailers. In Chapters 5-7 the authors determine the profitability of various wholesale-price strategies; this analysis culminates in Chapters 8 and 9 with the determination of the (very limited) conditions under which channel coordination can be optimal for the manufacturer. In Chapter 11 they prove that existing methods of measuring the effect of a change in the degree of inter-retailer substitutability are totally misleading. They then develop an original, theoretical basis for measuring the impact of a change in the degree of inter-retailer substitutability that yields insightful, intuitively appealing results. In Chapter 12 the authors set forth an agenda for future research based on a meta-model that embraces all existing models in the literature. They also issue an appeal for creation of a "Unifying Theory of Distribution Channels" that will enable researchers to work independently and yet to contribute toward the common goal of deepening the marketing science professions’ understanding of distribution channels.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VI
9
VII
9
VIII
12
IX
17
X
22
XI
23
XII
29
XIII
30
LII
282
LIII
283
LIV
289
LV
297
LVI
302
LVII
311
LVIII
316
LXI
317

XIV
34
XV
48
XVI
67
XVII
71
XVIII
75
XXI
77
XXII
83
XXIII
92
XXIV
107
XXV
111
XXVI
115
XXVII
118
XXVIII
119
XXIX
129
XXX
133
XXXI
151
XXXII
164
XXXIII
179
XXXIV
190
XXXV
194
XXXVII
197
XXXVIII
201
XXXIX
204
XL
209
XLI
216
XLII
225
XLIII
230
XLIV
234
XLV
242
XLVI
243
XLVII
249
XLVIII
264
XLIX
269
L
276
LI
280
LXII
322
LXIV
334
LXV
342
LXVII
355
LXVIII
358
LXIX
368
LXXII
369
LXXIII
370
LXXIV
384
LXXV
392
LXXVII
403
LXXVIII
418
LXXIX
420
LXXX
422
LXXXI
425
LXXXII
449
LXXXIII
459
LXXXIV
464
LXXXV
465
LXXXVI
474
LXXXVII
478
LXXXVIII
490
LXXXIX
495
XC
506
XCIII
507
XCIV
509
XCV
511
XCVI
514
XCVII
519
XCVIII
524
XCIX
534
C
540
CI
548
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?
Page 9 - The difficulty lies, not in the new ideas, but in escaping the old ones, which ramify, for those brought up as most of us have been, into every corner of our minds.

Bibliographic information