Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art: With a Critical Text and Translation of the Poetics. With a Prefatory Essay, Aristotelian Literary Criticism

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Courier Corporation, 1951 M01 1 - 421 pages
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"An intellectual adventure of the most stimulating kind." -- The New York Times
This book contains the celebrated Butcher translation of Aristotle's Poetics, faced, page by page, with the complete Greek text ( as reconstructed by Mr. Butcher from Greek, Latin, and Arabic manuscripts). The editor's 300-page exposition and interpretation follows. In his classic commentary, Butcher discusses with insight, sympathy, and great learning Aristotle's ideas and their importance in the history of thought and literature. His scholarly remarks cover art and nature, imitation as an aesthetic term, poetic truth, pleasure as the end of fine art, art and morality, the function of tragedy, the dramatic unities, the ideal tragic hero, plot and character, comedy, and poetic universality. A new 35-page introductory essay, "Aristotelian Literary Criticism" by John Glassner, discusses the validity of Aristotle's ideas today and their application to contemporary literature.
"No edition with commentary can be recommended to English readers with such confidence as Butcher's." -- George Saintsbury
"One of the finest treatises on aesthetic theory -- neither the literature nor the criticism of the past 40 years has rendered Aristotelian criticism irrelevant or obsolete." -- Modern Schoolman

 

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Contents

V
6
VI
113
VIII
121
IX
163
X
198
XI
215
XII
240
XIII
274
XIV
302
XV
334
XVI
368
XVII
389
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About the author (1951)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

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