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" No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. "
Character of Lord Bacon: His Life and Works - Page 17
by Thomas Martin - 1835 - 367 pages
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 34

1855 - 602 pages
...orator and debater. " There happened in my time," says Ben Jonson, " one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, leas idleness, in what...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Ed.; with a ...

Francis Bacon - 1844 - 610 pages
...truth ; yet there happened in my lime one noble speaker, who was full of gravity In his speaking. IIi> language (where he could spare or pass by a jest)...nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more prcssly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, leas Idleness, in what he uttered. No member of...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 18

1849 - 600 pages
...highly qualified to judge of his pretensions. " There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious (censor-like) ; no man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness,...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Ed.; with a ...

Francis Bacon - 1844 - 610 pages
...gravity in bia speaking. His language (where be could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorioue. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, lets idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. Ilia hearerscould...
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The Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England ...

John Campbell Baron Campbell - 1845 - 672 pages
...in the Lower House. " There happened in my time," says Ben Jonson, " one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what...
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The Great Oyer of Poisoning: The Trial of the Earl of Somerset for the ...

Andrew Amos - 1846 - 598 pages
...him!" " There happened," writes Ben Jonson of Bacon, " in my time, one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he...pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more greatly, more precisely, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, or less idleness in...
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The Great Oyer of Poisoning: The Trial of the Earl of Somerset for the ...

Andrew Amos - 1846 - 576 pages
...heard him!" "There happened," writes Ben Jonson of Bacon, " in my time, one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he...pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more greatly, more precisely, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, or less idleness in...
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Essays, Critical and Miscellaneous

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1846 - 782 pages
...often quoted, will bear to be quoted again. " There happened in my time one noble speaker who was foil The queen harangued them. The priests ϸ Z* spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy, Volume 1

George Lillie Craik - 1846 - 778 pages
...speaking. His language, where he could spare or pass hy a jest, was nohly censorious [censorlike]. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more...less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No memher of his speech hut consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough , or look aside from...
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Bacon: His Writings, and His Philosophy, Volume 2

George Lillie Craik - 1846 - 730 pages
...reference to his speaking in Parliament : — " There happened in my time one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious [censorlike]. No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness,...
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