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" No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. "
Character of Lord Bacon: His Life and Works - Page 17
by Thomas Martin - 1835 - 367 pages
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Prose Quotations from Socrates to Macaulay: With Indexes...

Samuel Austin Allibone - 1876 - 768 pages
...often quoted, will bear to be quoted again. " There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weighty, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he...
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The Great Conversers: And Other Essays

William Mathews - 1876 - 322 pages
...aphorisms. Ben Jonson, a severe judge, who was chary of his praise, tells us that "no man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. The fear of every man who heard...
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Bacon's essays, with intr., notes and index by E.A. Abbott, Volume 1

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1876 - 300 pages
...clear from the suggestive exception made by his eulogist Ben Jonson, when speaking of his eloquence : ' his language (where he could spare or pass by a jest) was nobly censorious.' Again, it is the recognition of similitudes that originates 1 Works, Vol. iii. p. 519. XXXVI11 Introduction...
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The Albany Law Journal: A Monthly Record of the Law and the Lawyers, Volume 16

1877 - 510 pages
...they are all applicable to Mr. Choate : " There happened in my time one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he...pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less idleness, in what he uttered. No...
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Albany Law Journal, Volume 16

1877 - 506 pages
...for they are all applicable to Mr. Choate: "There happened in my time one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language (where he...pass by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less idleness, in what he uttered. No...
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Masterpieces in English Literature: And Lessons in the English Language with ...

Homer Baxter Sprague - 1878 - 462 pages
...commendation of old Ben Jonson, who says, "There happened in my time one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or Buffered less emptiness, less idleness in what he uttered. No member of his speech hut consisted of...
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An Account of the Life and Times of Francis Bacon, Volume 2

James Spedding - 1878 - 732 pages
...— may as truly be said of Bacon. What Ben Jonson said of him as a speaker, — " No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered," — is quite as true of him as a writer. And besides all this he had that mysterious gift to which...
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The Great Conversers: And Other Essays

William Mathews - 1878 - 324 pages
...Jonson, a severe judge, who was chary of his praise, tells us that "no man ever spoke more neatlv, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. His hearers could not cough, or look aside from him, without loss. The fear of every man who heard...
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The British Parliament ... The pearls and mock pearls of history ...

Abraham Hayward - 1878 - 476 pages
...There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, when he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what...
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Shaw's New History of English Literature

Thomas Budd Shaw - 1879 - 448 pages
...speaking. His language, when he could spare or pass a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered...idleness in what he uttered. No member of his speech hut consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. He...
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