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" But the greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge : for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity, and inquisitive appetite ; sometimes to... "
Character of Lord Bacon: His Life and Works - Page 107
by Thomas Martin - 1835 - 367 pages
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The London Lancet, Volume 2

1852 - 632 pages
...said,— " The greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge: for men have entered into a desire of learning sai knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity. a*3 inquisitive appetite ; sometimes to entertain...
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The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart: Translations of the passages in ...

Dugald Stewart - 1877 - 394 pages
...science. But the greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking and misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge. For men have entered into a desire...ornament and reputation ; and sometimes to enable them to win the victory by wit and contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession, and seldom sincerely...
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Philosophical works

Francis Bacon - 1854 - 894 pages
...greatest error of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or furthest end of learning and ] [ ; sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession...
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The Civil Engineer and Architect's Journal, Volume 17

William Laxton - 1854 - 608 pages
..."The greatest error of all the rest," he said, "is the mistaking or misplacing the last or furthest end of knowledge, for men have entered into a desire...natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite; sometimes, for ornament and reputation; sometimes, for victory of art and contradiction; seldom, sincerely to...
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Bacon's essays, with annotations by R. Whately

Francis Bacon (visct. St. Albans.) - 1856 - 562 pages
...mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge, is the greatest error of all the rest : For, men have entered into a desire of learning and...contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession ; — but seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of...
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A Compendium of English Literature: Chronologically Arranged, from Sir John ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - 1856 - 800 pages
...nations and to my own country after some time a passed over." 1 DIVERSE OBJECTS OF MEN TO GAIN KNOWLEDGE. Men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge...ornament and reputation ; and sometimes to enable them to victor}' of wit and contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession ; and seldom sincerely...
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The Popular lecturer [afterw.] Pitman's Popular lecturer (and ..., Volumes 4-6

Henry Pitman - 1316 pages
...greatest error of all the rest is the mistaking or misplacing the last or furthest end of learning1 and knowledge, sometimes upon a natural curiosity...and delight, sometimes for ornament and reputation, sometimes to enable them to victory of wit and contradiction, and most times for lucre and profession,...
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The American Journal of Education, Volume 2

Henry Barnard - 1856 - 768 pages
...error,' says that great writer, 'of all the rest, is the mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge ; for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon. &c seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason to the benefit and use of men, as...
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Bacon's Essays: With Annotations

Francis Bacon, Richard Whately - 1857 - 578 pages
...mistaking or misplacing of the last or farthest end of knowledge, is the greatest error of all the rest : For, men have entered into a desire of learning and...contradiction ; and most times for lucre and profession ; — but seldom sincerely to give a true account of their gift of reason, to the benefit and use of...
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Lectures on the British Poets, Volume 1

Henry Reed - 1857 - 424 pages
...conclusion I desire to quote : — " The greatest error is the mistaking or misplacing the last or furthest end of knowledge ; for men have entered into a desire of learning and knowledge, sometimes upon natural curiosity and inquisitive appetite, sometimes to entertain their minds with variety and delight,...
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