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" No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His hearers could not cough or look aside from him without loss. "
Character of Lord Bacon: His Life and Works - Page 17
by Thomas Martin - 1835 - 367 pages
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A Harmony of the Essays, Etc. of Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - 1871 - 674 pages
...noble Speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, (where hee could spare, or passe by a jest) was nobly censorious. No man ever spake more neatly, more presly, more weightily, or suffer' d lesse emptinesse, les,se idlenesse, in what hee utter'd. No member...
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The Works of Lord Macaulay Complete, Volume 6

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1873 - 728 pages
...often quoted, will bear to be quoted again. " There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what...
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The American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge, Volume 2

George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana - 1873
...always in after life remember. Ben Jonson compliments his parliamentary eloquence highly, alleging that "no man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more...or suffered less emptiness, less idleness in what ho uttered ; no member of his speech but consisted of its own graces. His hearers could not cough or...
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Masterpieces in English Literature, and Lessons in the English Language ...

Homer Baxter Sprague - 1874 - 474 pages
...commendation of old Ben Jonson, who says, " There happened in my time one noble speaker, who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever si>:ike more neatly, more prcssly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness in what...
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The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His ..., Volume 7

Francis Bacon - 1874 - 672 pages
...impression took " — may as truly be said of Bacon. "What Ben Jonson said of him as a speaker — " no man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more...less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered" — is quite as true of him as a writer. And besides all this he had that mysterious gift to which...
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The Letters and the Life of Francis Bacon Including All His ..., Volume 7

Francis Bacon - 1874 - 676 pages
...deep impression took "— may as truly be said of Bncon. "What Ben Jonson said of him as a speaker—" no man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness,inwhat he uttered" —is quite as true of him as a writer. And besides all this he had that...
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Biographical and Critical Essays: Reprinted from Reviews

Abraham Hayward - 1874 - 480 pages
...There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, when he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what...
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Bericht Über Die Realschule I. Ordnung Zu Leipzig Im Schuljahr 1874-1875

Michael Walsh - 1875 - 94 pages
...describes Bacon's eloquence as follows: „There happened in my time one noble speaker who was full of gravity in his speaking. His language, where he...pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, 6) Works, Lett. Temp. Eliz. No. 7. or suffered less...
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Critical and Historical Essays Contributed to the Edinburgh Review

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - 1875 - 876 pages
...he could spare or pass by a jest, was nobly censorious. No man ever spoke more neatly, more prcssly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech bnt his profession. He bore, with a patience ] consisted of his own graces. His and serenity which,...
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Eminent English writers

William Lawson (F.R.G.S.) - 1875 - 268 pages
...1585, and soon distinguished himself in debate. Ben Jonson, speaking of his power as an orator, says, "No man ever spake more neatly, more pressly, more weightily, or suffered less emptiness, or less idleness, in what he uttered. No member of his speech but consisted of his own graces. His...
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